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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia With rTMS

January 7, 2021

Overview

The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia With rTMS study aims to test the effectiveness of a type of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating patients with insomnia, who are also being treated for depression using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

 

Study Information 

As part of their clinical treatment for depression, both sets of participants will be undergoing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, or rTMS (a therapy that stimulates various regions of the brain) for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for a total of 6 weeks. Only one set of participants will undergo weekly hour-long sessions of CBT, also for a total of 6 weeks. The focus of these sessions will be improving sleep. 

 

Inclusion Criteria:

 

  • 18-85 years old
  • Is starting rTMS treatment for major depressive disorder
  • Has insomnia that meets the following criteria:  (1) Patient requires more than 30 minutes to fall asleep, or spends more than 30 minutes awake after falling asleep, for a minimum of 3 nights per week for at least 3 months (2) Scores 15 or higher on the insomnia severity index
  • Has sleep troubles that cause significant impairment in daily life 
  • Has reliable access to a computer and the internet.

 

Exclusion Criteria:

 

  • Follows an irregular sleep schedule 
  • Has received CBT for insomnia in the past
  • Has started taking a sedative medication or sedating antidepressant in the 2 weeks prior to enrolling in the study
  • Has comorbid psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder, psychotic disorders or depression with psychotic features
  • Suffers from an untreated sleep issue such as obstructive sleep apnea
  • Is pregnant
  • Has suffered from substance use disorder in the past 3 months
  • Uses medications that reduce the seizure threshold such as Buproprion as well as stimulants or augmenting thyroid medications

 

Locations

Medical University of South Charleston

South Carolina, United States

 

Sponsors / Collaborators

Medical University of South Carolina

Drug Abuse Research Training Program

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